Read Young Elizabeth: The Making of the Queen by Kate Williams Online

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We can hardly imagine a Britain without Elizabeth II on the throne. It seems to be the job she was born for. And yet for much of her early life the young princess did not know the role that her future would hold. She was our accidental Queen.Elizabeth's determination to share in the struggles of her people marked her out from a young age. Her father initially refused to leWe can hardly imagine a Britain without Elizabeth II on the throne. It seems to be the job she was born for. And yet for much of her early life the young princess did not know the role that her future would hold. She was our accidental Queen.Elizabeth's determination to share in the struggles of her people marked her out from a young age. Her father initially refused to let her volunteer as a nurse during the Blitz, but relented when she was 18 and allowed her to work as a mechanic and truck driver for the Women's Auxiliary Territorial Service. It was her forward-thinking approach that ensured that her coronation was televised, against the advice of politicians at the time.Kate Williams reveals how the 25-year-old young queen carved out a lasting role for herself amid the changes of the 20th century. Her monarchy would be a very different one to that of her parents and grandparents, and its continuing popularity in the 21st century owes much to the intelligence and elusive personality of this remarkable woman....

Title : Young Elizabeth: The Making of the Queen
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9781605988917
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 336 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Young Elizabeth: The Making of the Queen Reviews

  • Kelsey
    2018-10-10 20:49

    Honestly, I started out only reading this because I'm watching The Crown on Netflix. But once I got into it, I realized that Elizabeth is a rather amazing woman. Kate Williams writes in a scholarly manner without being pretentious. She also writes very respectfully despite the controversial trials that the royal family has faced. Williams ends the book by saying that Queen Elizabeth II is the twentieth century and before reading this book, my response would have been rather nonchalant. However, now that I've read this book, I have a greater understanding and appreciation for Queen Elizabeth II. I also have a greater understanding of the royal family in general. Seeing as I live in the US, I don't know much of the rich history behind the monarchy. Reading this has probably sparked a new research topic for a while. I hope everyone around me will be okay with me spouting off facts about the English Monarchy for a while.

  • Jean Poulos
    2018-09-30 16:29

    This book was written for the Queen’s Jubilee in 2012. It is not an official biography and the Queen was not interviewed for the book. It just presents known information about the Queen.The Queen was born in 1926 and was never expected to be Queen until the 1936 abdication of her uncle King Edward VIII. Edward’s younger brother and Elizabeth’s father became King. She then started her training to become the monarch. She drove ambulances during World War II. She became Queen in 1952. The book concludes with Elizabeth becoming Queen. The Queen is a suburb horsewoman as is Princess Anne who was the first Royal to compete in the Olympics in 1976. HRH Anne’s daughter Zara Phillips competed in the Olympics in 2012; all three women have won many medals in equestrian competitions. The book is well written and researched. It provides an overview of the life of the Queen. Williams writes in a light easy to read manner with humor and gossip. There is no new information; Williams presents the official information but her easy to read style makes it enjoyable. Williams has written a biography of Queen Victoria. I read this as an audiobook downloaded from Audible. Kate Williams narrated her own book.

  • Laura
    2018-10-12 19:30

    I just finished watching "The Crown" on Netflix, and if this book wasn't the basis for the series, then it should have been. There isn't much difference between the two - and I enjoyed both.

  • Sarah
    2018-10-18 18:58

    For fans of the tv shows The Crown this fills in her childhood, marriage and up to the Coronation. Loved it

  • Jessica
    2018-09-17 19:47

    Great bio, although it ended abruptly and the last 10% was pure Margaret.

  • Lynn Daniels
    2018-09-30 00:36

    This book left me frustrated and annoyed. I like to think that I understand a lot of modern British history, especially as it concerns the monarchy. I'm usually the local source when my friends and coworkers are trying to figure out what is going on.But with this book? While the information presented was factual and interesting, Kate Williams gamboled through the decades - talking about an incident in the 30s with Lord Mountbatten, and something that happened in the late 90s with Princess Diana all within two pages. There were few contextual clues that helped me to understand what exactly was going on. While this book does present an interesting and sympathetic portrait of the Woman Who Shouldn't Have Been Queen (a dominant theme in the early part of the book), trying to follow it left me feeling a little like Old Mother Dismass!

  • Rhonda
    2018-09-18 17:53

    Wonderful book! I could read it a few more times but I had to give it back to the library!

  • Elizabeth Amato
    2018-10-06 16:35

    I'd say 3.5 stars on this one. It's not a page-turner, but I learned a lot about WWII.

  • Lydia Carns
    2018-10-11 22:38

    Young Elizabeth begins before the birth of the 'accidental' queen, with King George V's children, particularly his two eldest sons, who would be Edward VIII and George VI. The princesses Elizabeth and Margaret were raised as the children of a royal Duke, but they were never expected to be the children of the King. Young Elizabeth paints a picture of family life at 145 Piccadilly in the years before the abdication. Elizabeth and Margaret were adored by the public, and the press often turned to them for some lighter news throughout their early lives, as those were years of political and social unrest. As princesses, they lived a somewhat sheltered life within Buckingham Palace, and spent the dreary wartime years entirely at Windsor Castle. They lived with their governess, Marion Crawford, whom they called 'Crawfie'. The last third of the book was dedicated to Queen Elizabeth's marriage, George VI's health struggles during his last few years and, finally, the coronation. There was some interesting history and behind the scenes looks. For instance, how there was such a lack of coachmen because of the war and carriages falling out of use, that gentry was asked to take part if they could drive a coach. Marion Crawford reportedly read P. G. Wodehouse novels while Princess Elizabeth had her history lesson with Eton's headmaster, and Queen Elizabeth (later the queen mother) was said to have been trying to get an eyelash out of the King's eye when Buckingham Palace was first bombed. It contained more information on Edward's VIII's relationships with Wallis Simpson and other women than I was interested in knowing. (That took up about a quarter of the book's beginning.) Also, Princess Margaret's relationship with one of her father's equerries. For all the time which was spent on Group Captain Townsend and Princess Margaret, I wish a little more information on her actual marriage had been added. It made the end a sight depressing. All in all I thought the two histories were off topic and shouldn't have taken up so much of the book.Otherwise, it was an interesting read and I would recommend it (reservedly) to someone who was interested in an all-encompassing read about Queen Elizabeth II.

  • Andie
    2018-09-25 00:34

    The story of the life of Queen Elizabeth II up to the time of her coronation shows that she has not changed much in her life. She was a dutiful child, a dutiful young woman and became a dutiful queen., This is not new information. What was new - at least in the way the author presented it - was how lackadaisical her parents were about her education, not really giving her any firm foundation in history or statecraft until the dowager Queen Mary took it into her own hands. Similarly, when the crisis of the relationship of Princes Margaret and Peter Townsend occurred right under the royal noses, everyone seemed to be too preoccupied with their own concerns to take notice of what was happening.. The whole family seemed to live in their own world, totally ignorant of what was going on outside the palace walls. Maybe the jolts of the 1990's were a good thing after all.

  • Katie Bee
    2018-09-26 18:49

    I read this book for the reason I suspect many others have - because I just binged The Crown on Netflix and wanted more backstory than the show gave. While I've read about the Queen's early years before, I haven't done so for some years, and this was a pleasant refresher. Williams gives the reader a smooth experience, drawing on a wide range of sources, and I enjoyed the book. The ending is the least successful - abrupt and a bit slapdash, primarily concerned with a short and disorganized discussion of Margaret's love-life. I think it would probably have been more successful to end with the Coronation and a more polished and retrospective conclusion. But rounding off a book like this one seems like it'd be one of the most difficult elements to land, so that's understandable.

  • Chris Aylott
    2018-10-17 22:37

    Royalists and republicans will both find things to enjoy in this look at the life of young Princess Elizabeth, mostly because the princesses are adorable and the rest of the Windsors seem thoroughly inbred and defective. I'm skeptical enough to think Williams has an affection for Elizabeth and Margaret that rose-tinted their portrayals, but it does make the book a pleasant read. There's also no question that Elizabeth turned out to be a great queen, so her parents must have done *something* right.

  • Kathy Cox
    2018-10-03 20:50

    I read this as a supplement to having watched The Crown. This book filled in many of the gaps for me and enhanced my knowledge of WW2 from the British perspective. The queen that has reigned for the past 60 years was definitely molded by the experiences she had as a young teenager. She witnessed and weathered much of the destruction of her country and her empire. The fear and rationing she underwent steeled her for the tough decisions that would be needed to be a fair and faithful queen.

  • Francesca
    2018-09-23 21:50

    Although I love the Queen and the Royal Family and therefore found the content very interesting, it wasn't very well written and had far too many spelling mistakes for my liking.

  • Kris
    2018-09-28 21:31

    Started out as a four star, as I learned things I hadn't before about her earlier life. Ended up as a three, as it seems the last few chapters had some wild conjecture that didn't ring true. The fact that the sources are listed as an appendix, not individually as footnotes, doesn't lend it credibility either.Enjoyed it, but ended on a more sour note.

  • Cecilia
    2018-10-16 17:37

    I picked up this book because I too, like other reviewers, have been watching Netflix’s The Crown.This is a great companion to the series. Not heavy reading but well done to fill in the blanks and give background to rather fast pace series.

  • Kenzie Erickson
    2018-10-14 18:44

    this was a truly delightful book. it gave me some insight on a queen who I've never been fond of because I didn't truly understand. she's quite an interesting woman to be sure. I enjoyed the unbiased information on the royal family.

  • Melissa
    2018-09-28 19:56

    Loved, LOVED this book! I learned a lot of things about Elizabeth's character that I never knew and which made her even more beloved in my eyes! This book is perfect for watchers of the The Crown. It follows it exactly!!

  • Lois Melbourne
    2018-10-06 21:51

    Educational and interesting. The stories provide the narrative for the family dynamic within her childhood and how she became queen. The war time stories are less then I expected but very interesting.

  • Liz
    2018-09-26 23:54

    I always enjoy reading about the royal family. This was a look back at Elizabeth's life from her birth. I have read a lot about the royals and always like finding out new things as I did in this book.

  • Tiffany
    2018-09-21 22:53

    Honestly, I know nothing about the British Monarchy, never followed, never understood everyone's fascination with it. I'm sure this book was the Cliff Notes version of her life, but I did really enjoy it and thought it was very interesting.

  • Allyson
    2018-09-30 18:29

    Loved this! I just finished watching The Crown and this helped give a little more detail into some of the stories. It was really interesting, and I liked the authors style. Particularly with her uncle that abdicated, I liked the added details she gave about that situation.

  • Rosemary Wood
    2018-10-15 16:29

    A fast read, I enjoyed the book and learned quite a bit about the history of Great Britain's royal lineage. I found the chapters on the ramifications of The Prince of Wales' abdication, Elizabeth's and Margaret's childhood and life during the WWII blitz especially interesting.

  • Jennifer
    2018-09-28 20:37

    This was a pleasant fast read. I've read another biography of Queen Elizabeth's whole life and it was nice to go deeper into the pre-Coronation years. As always, I wonder how much of this is true, especially since the family and its employees tend to be so tight-lipped. Still, fun to read.

  • Ann
    2018-10-16 17:30

    A thorough account of Queen Elizabeth life up to her first year of reign. The author provides the family history that I wanted/needed to put her story in perceptive. Well-written.

  • Donna
    2018-10-08 23:55

    Interesting read about one of the most iconic women of the twentieth century.

  • Lafourche Parish Library
    2018-10-02 22:29

    his past year, Queen Elizabeth II became the United Kingdom’s longest reigning monarch, overtaking her great-great grandmother Queen Victoria.This year, she nears another milestone, her 90th birthday in April.For those of us “across the pond,” we might not pay too much attention to the goings-on in the United Kingdom. Of course, many of us were enthralled by the pageantry of the Queen’s heir Prince Charles’ marriage to Lady Diana Spencer; heartbroken at Diana’s tragic death years later; and, lately, fascinated by Prince William’s growing young family.But Queen Elizabeth?It seems some of us give her less thought than her heirs.To her credit, Queen Elizabeth II – known variously as Lilibet, Cabbage, or, simply, “granny” to members of her family – has reigned for decades with calm and decorum in a role that she, as a young girl, had not envisioned ever finding herself in – and she’s done it for longer than anyone else.Hers is an interesting life, and if you’d like to delve into the Queen’s formative years, try Kate Williams’ biography Young Elizabeth: The Making of the Queen, which centers on her early years to a few years after her coronation as Queen Elizabeth II in 1953. In Young Elizabeth, Williams provides insight into the young princess’s home life, from her time as a toddler and beyond, and in doing so, allows readers to see the royal family as not just a collection of royals, but as a family. The reader sees the “little princesses” – Elizabeth and her younger sister Margaret – growing up as history was taking place all around them and, later, Elizabeth’s own role in making history.If you like biographies, are interested in English history or the lives of world leaders, you might give Young Elizabeth: The Making of the Queen a try. It is available from the Thibodaux, Lockport, and South Lafourche branches. Large print copies of the book are available from the Lockport and South Lafourche branches.his past year, Queen Elizabeth II became the United Kingdom’s longest reigning monarch, overtaking her great-great grandmother Queen Victoria.This year, she nears another milestone, her 90th birthday in April.For those of us “across the pond,” we might not pay too much attention to the goings-on in the United Kingdom. Of course, many of us were enthralled by the pageantry of the Queen’s heir Prince Charles’ marriage to Lady Diana Spencer; heartbroken at Diana’s tragic death years later; and, lately, fascinated by Prince William’s growing young family.But Queen Elizabeth?It seems some of us give her less thought than her heirs.To her credit, Queen Elizabeth II – known variously as Lilibet, Cabbage, or, simply, “granny” to members of her family – has reigned for decades with calm and decorum in a role that she, as a young girl, had not envisioned ever finding herself in – and she’s done it for longer than anyone else.Hers is an interesting life, and if you’d like to delve into the Queen’s formative years, try Kate Williams’ biography Young Elizabeth: The Making of the Queen, which centers on her early years to a few years after her coronation as Queen Elizabeth II in 1953. In Young Elizabeth, Williams provides insight into the young princess’s home life, from her time as a toddler and beyond, and in doing so, allows readers to see the royal family as not just a collection of royals, but as a family. The reader sees the “little princesses” – Elizabeth and her younger sister Margaret – growing up as history was taking place all around them and, later, Elizabeth’s own role in making history.If you like biographies, are interested in English history or the lives of world leaders, you might give Young Elizabeth: The Making of the Queen a try. It is available from the Thibodaux, Lockport, and South Lafourche branches. Large print copies of the book are available from the Lockport and South Lafourche branches.

  • Marian Kamatchi
    2018-10-18 19:51

    After watching "The Crown" I wanted more. I enjoyed getting a more detailed look at her life. I want to read more but I kinda need a break from the monarchy.

  • Connie Fischer
    2018-10-15 23:55

    This book starts with the birth and celebration of the young Princess Elizabeth. It discusses the stubbornness of David who enjoys the playboy life and refuses to give up the twice-divorced, Wallis Simpson, which finally results in him abdicating the throne. This leaves Bertie to take over in his place. Bertie has always been a very shy man with a stammer. This makes him terrified of any public speaking. His wife, Elizabeth, is very supportive of him and her vivacious nature makes her a very popular royal.Princess Elizabeth and her younger sister, Princess Margaret, have led a very private life which consists of the nursery and their governesses. While the public loves them, their parents don’t allow them to be seen very often. It isn’t until Elizabeth is a young teen before she is allowed to have her own suite of rooms. The King is very protective of his girls and he and Elizabeth insist that the girls dress alike even though they are not young children. They enjoy playing in the gardens. Their daily schedule is quite strict, but a huge criticism is that there are not enough hours spent on their education.When World War II starts, things change that ends up with them experiencing rationing just as others do. The sisters do their part by making things for the soldiers. They even learn how to protect themselves when there is bombing.We learn about Elizabeth meeting Prince Philip and all about his background. Theirs can be called love at first sight. For Elizabeth, there is no one else. After their marriage, Elizabeth soon gives birth to Prince Charles followed by Princess Anne. It is a number of years before she has their third child.When Bertie dies, the Princess is on vacation with Philip in a remote part of Africa so it takes some hours before she learns that she is now the Queen of England. The preparation for her coronation is very detailed and it is with great bravery and dignity that she pledges herself to her people.I have read many books about the royal family and Queen Elizabeth. This one looks at her life from a different angle and is very educational about the history of the family and the daily life of the Queen from the time she was a child until she attained the Throne of England. I never tire of learning more about the Royal Family and highly recommend this book.

  • Lauralee
    2018-09-22 20:51

    Young Elizabeth and the Making of the Queen chronicles the early life of Queen Elizabeth II to her coronation. In this biography, Queen Elizabeth was never meant to be a queen. However, due to the scandal of Edward VIII and his abdication, this paved the way for her ascension to the British throne. While Elizabeth was not wholly prepared for her role as queen, she played the role successfully. In over half a century, Queen Elizabeth’s role and image has remained constant. Queen Elizabeth’s childhood was idyllic. Her father and mother did not provide their children with a good education because they loathed it when they were children. When Edward VIII gave up his throne. Elizabeth and Margaret knew that their lives had changed dramatically. They were in the spotlight, and Elizabeth had a duty as queen. This book describes how Elizabeth was the poster girl, especially in WWII, and how she had to play her part. She is portrayed as a woman who is pressured to play her role well. She is very charming and photogenic. However, this biography does not cover up Elizabeth’s faults. She can be temperamental, stubborn, and unforgiving. Still, Elizabeth is a fascinating and complex woman.Overall, this biography shows that behind that glamorous facade of being a queen, in actuality the role can be very lonely. This biography is very comprehensive to the average reader. While there are no new facts surrounding Elizabeth’s young life, I thought it was interesting how Elizabeth is portrayed. Elizabeth is a smart and pragmatic young woman. She learns from tragedies in her life, especially the death of her father, about what it means to be queen. There were some chapters that I thought were irrelevant to this biography. I thought Princess Margaret’s and Peter Townsend’s romance and Princess Diana’s death should have been left out. Still, I recommend this biography to those who do not know much about Queen Elizabeth’s early life or those who want to read a different portrayal of Queen Elizabeth.(Note: I read an ARC copy of this novel in courtesy of Edelweiss.)