Read 50 ways of saying fabulous book 1 by Graeme Aitken Online

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Billy-Boy preferred culture to cows, but when you’re the only son of a rugby-loving Kiwi farmer, you buckle down and do your chores. And escape into a fantasy world of cross-dressing and theatricals at every other opportunity! Sweet, fat, theatrical Billy-Boy was never cut out to be a farmer, but as his father’s only son he’s obliged to try. The cows are wayward and the c Billy-Boy preferred culture to cows, but when you’re the only son of a rugby-loving Kiwi farmer, you buckle down and do your chores.And escape into a fantasy world of cross-dressing and theatricals at every other opportunity! Sweet, fat, theatrical Billy-Boy was never cut out to be a farmer, but as his father’s only son he’s obliged to try. The cows are wayward and the chores are gruelling, but Billy finds escape in a fantasy world. A place where the turnip paddock becomes a lunar landscape, a lavender bed jacket a slinky space suit, a cow’s tail a head of beautiful blonde hair, and where Billy can become Judy Robinson, heroine of TV’s 'Lost in Space'.But in an isolated conservative farming community in New Zealand, not everyone approves of Billy’s transformation. On the brink of adolescence, Billy is beginning to discover that growing up is far more complicated and confusing than he could ever have imagined. While the mysteries of sex confound him, emotions are unleashed which urge Billy to betray those closest to him. ˃˃˃ '50 Ways of Saying Fabulous' is a poignant and endearingly comic novel.Anyone who grew up in a small town, grew up feeling that they didn’t fit in, or simply grew up will find this book funny, touching and unforgettably evocative of childhood lost. ˃˃˃ Praise for '50 Ways of Saying Fabulous': 'I loved this funny sad tale of growing up a sissy in New Zealand. Graeme Aitken proves that even the most extraordinary events can occur to wonderfully ordinary people. If I knew fifty ways of saying fabulous, I’d use them all to praise this charming first novel.’ EDMUND WHITE'Thoroughly engaging.' INDEPENDENT ON SUNDAY'A funny but also achingly sad first novel'. OBSERVER'A sort of gay Adrian Mole ... There are laughs aplenty but also moments of agony ... Told with bare faced honesty, it is a warm, cruel, funny tale.' THE SUNDAY AGE'Touching and sad, '50 Ways of Saying Fabulous' also has some very funny moments.' THE TIMES'An entertainment, a gentle, poignant story of a fat boy who fantasises romance and glamour without yet having a name for what he is ... Aitken writes with a distinctive voice, one that is wonderfully evocative.' DENNIS ALTMAN, THE AGE'... an important work ... What Aitken has demonstrated fabulously is his skill in the art of telling a good story ... his honesty and fearlessness in confronting those squirmy adolescent secrets is to be admired.' CANBERRA TIMES...

Title : 50 ways of saying fabulous book 1
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 26258107
Format Type : Kindle Edition
Number of Pages : 154 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

50 ways of saying fabulous book 1 Reviews

  • Eileen Reynolds
    2018-12-16 09:23

    An quick read. Well written. Am looking forward to reading the series.

  • Marina Schulz
    2018-11-28 09:09

    NO. I profoundly hated this book. **************************I received this book as a free kindle and I am a sucker for free things. Coming in, I expected it to be about a young boy, from rural Australia, who finds out and comes to terms witht the fact that he is gay. Personally, I had no problem with the author saying the boy is a bit overweight, or that he is 12, or that he comes from the country side. Hey, these are all unique-ish things, that could make for an interesting story. Besides, anyone can be gay, no problem in that, so I figured it would be a relatable story for some people. But even though the story started promissingly, it very very quickly becomes too graphic for my taste. Its like the author did his best to find the grossest things in every single aspect adressed. Literally nothing was left unscatted, and I remember feeling very squirmish during the reading process. For instance, I understand country life isn't all about meadows and fields, but did the author have to be so repetitive to state that it wasn't a good farm? Did he have to get into every detail about the manure and childbirthing process of cows and things? And don't even get me started with the rest of it: the author spends a completely disporoportionate amount of time describing every roll on the main characters body, commenting on how he eats a lot, how he is just blubber, et all. Its pretty gross, and it certainly doesn't read like the character even likes himself (nor does he at any point come to terms with his weight - whether to change it or to accept it.)Speaking of gross, I get that the human body, in general, can be quite gross sometimes. Its ok, and normal, and even enjoyable, but again: did the author have to put so much emphasis onthe first masturbation of a 12 year old boy ?? And the subsequent relationship between him and another boy is anything but romantic, and just sexual. Not a good example, and the nature of it (casual sex between 12 year olds....) just makes me uncomfortable. So while I understand the need for fiction to portray gay coming of age novels that might even include masturbation and subjects of the like... The way it is described here is pointless, unnecessarily goory, and badly handled to say the least. Not to mention that sex (and other body functions) doesn't have to be disgusting, quite the contrary. Furthermore, the narrator's voice is not good. Despite being a 12 year old boy, the only part of the book that makes this apparent is his inexperience in sex: other than that he is a clearly disillusioned middle aged man. Utterly unbelievable, without a single relatable thought for the age period, and way too non-chalant and unenthusiastic about everything in his life. To end with, I will say the book has an open ending, so we don't even get the very limited satisfaction of learning how it concludes.

  • Kent Miller
    2018-11-22 15:30

    Sweet, fat, theatrical Billy-Boy was never cut out to be a farmer, but as his father’s only son he’s obliged to try. The cows are wayward and the chores are gruelling, but Billy finds escape in a fantasy world. A place where the turnip paddock becomes a lunar landscape, a lavender bed jacket a slinky space suit, a cow’s tail a head of beautiful blonde hair, and where Billy can become Judy Robinson, heroine of TV’s 'Lost in Space'. But in an isolated conservative farming community in 1970s New Zealand, not everyone approves of Billy’s transformation. On the brink of adolescence, Billy is beginning to discover that growing up is far more complicated and confusing than he could ever have imagined. While the mysteries of sex confound him, emotions are unleashed which urge Billy to betray those closest to him. '50 Ways of Saying Fabulous' is a poignant and endearingly comic novel. Anyone who grew up in a small town, grew up feeling that they didn’t fit in, or simply grew up will find this book funny, touching and unforgettably evocative of childhood lost. Praise for '50 Ways of Saying Fabulous': 'I loved this funny sad tale of growing up a sissy in New Zealand. Graeme Aitken proves that even the most extraordinary events can occur to wonderfully ordinary people. If I knew fifty ways of saying fabulous, I’d use them all to praise this charming first novel.’ EDMUND WHITE 'Thoroughly engaging.' INDEPENDENT ON SUNDAY 'A funny but also achingly sad first novel'. OBSERVER 'A sort of gay Adrian Mole ... There are laughs aplenty but also moments of agony ... Told with bare faced honesty, it is a warm, cruel, funny tale.' THE SUNDAY AGE 'Touching and sad, '50 Ways of Saying Fabulous' also has some very funny moments.' THE TIMES 'An entertainment, a gentle, poignant story of a fat boy who fantasises romance and glamour without yet having a name for what he is ... Aitken writes with a distinctive voice, one that is wonderfully evocative.' DENNIS ALTMAN, THE AGE '... an important work ... What Aitken has demonstrated fabulously is his skill in the art of telling a good story ... his honesty and fearlessness in confronting those squirmy adolescent secrets is to be admired.' CANBERRA TIMES

  • Bex
    2018-12-03 16:14

    An interesting book that is more of a novella than a novel. this wouldn't have been an issue if I hadn't left for work with the page count at 75% only to fin I had one screen left then it went into adverts and reflections on the history of the writer and how it got turned into a film. Not what I wanted on my journey to work. It also ended on an unresolved note but without enough intrigue to convince me I needed the next one.

  • Ryan
    2018-11-29 14:24

    I had read and enjoyed all of Graham's other books and finally got around to reading 50 Ways, his first novel. This book gives us an insight into the life of Billy, a pre-adolescent boy living on a farm in Central Otago in the 70's. This is a tumultuous time of life for Billy as he grapples with his changing emotions and body.

  • Jemma
    2018-12-02 10:11

    A pretty interesting account of growing up gay in the middle of nowhere. Although, perhaps the tale of how his parents met is actually the best bit - a tale you probably haven't heard before. Presumably this story is so good because it was polished (several times if you include the film version) but still I suspect there was always a good seem of truth behind the show.

  • Puck
    2018-11-27 16:07

    I liked this book. It describes growing up gay in a world that is very different from my own. Apparently this edition is only the first half of the story; if the other half becomes available for free I may read it as well.

  • Brad Secrest
    2018-11-18 15:24

    A great coming of age storyThe story was enthralling with its varied, gruesomely disgusting and at the same time inspiringly beautiful characters. The story jumps around a bit, but does so with purpose. Its a great read!

  • Roni
    2018-11-20 09:14

    I couldn't bear reading further....decided to call it quits when I was 23% way reading the book. It couldn't keep me interested. So bored and blah.

  • Dee
    2018-12-01 15:17

    A story told very honestly but in an entertaining way.

  • Meg
    2018-11-16 09:04

    I didn't realize this was only book one! A quirky story about growing up gay in a rural area.